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Competition showcases skilled trades

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The Skills Canada National Competition (SCNC) is not just an event where the country's top students in skilled trades and technology go head to head. It's also an opportunity for more inexperienced students to expose themselves to a sector they may have never considered before.
Competition showcases skilled trades

DCN Multimedia Staff Writer

TORONTO

The Skills Canada National Competition (SCNC) is not just an event where the country's top students in skilled trades and technology go head to head. It's also an opportunity for more inexperienced students to expose themselves to a sector they may have never considered before.

“SCNC demonstrates to students the exciting career opportunities that exist in the skilled trades and technology world through hands-on experiences,” said SCNC director of communications Catherine Fortin. “There were many engaging opportunities for the students visiting the competition, including over 40 Try-A-Trade and Technology activities, demonstration on the Essential Skills Stage and a Career Zone with over 70 exhibitors.

The 20th SCNC touched down in Ontario this year, as competitors and visitors gathered at Toronto’s International Centre for the five-day event.

Try-A-Trade and Technology stations included, sheet metal work, electrical circuit building, plumbing, mechanical CADD and more.

There were also a handful of exhibitors stationed and ready to educate young people who had limited knowledge or misconceptions about the industry.

“It’s seen as a male-dominated industry,” says Jamie McMillan, founder of Journeyman, an initiative that promotes and supports women in the skilled construction trades.

“It’s important for us to attend events like these to educate young people about what the industry has to offer.”

She says students and their parents are really surprised once they’re told about some of the financial benefits of working in the skilled trades and the opportunity to be “learning and earning”, rather than paying to learn.

The competition held over 40 contests, naming first, second and third winners for each category.

Some of this year’s industry-related winners:

In the post-secondary welding category:

Gold went to Tommy St-Martin of Quebec, Silver went to Jeffrey Cloutier of Ontario, Bronze went to Shawn Guignard of New Brunswick;

In the steamfitter-pipefitter category:

Gold went to Pat De La Sablonniere of Saskatchewan, Silver went to Tyler Hamel of Alberta, Bronze went to Luc Parent of Ontario;

Winners in the post-secondary architectural technology and design:

Gold went to Jean Marc-Olivier of Quebec, Silver went to Nicholas Wawryk of Alberta, Bronze went to Kiziah Magnaye of Manitoba;

Winners in the post-secondary carpentry:

Gold went to Jessy Gouin-Labbe of Quebec, Silver went to Stephen Greydanus of Ontario, Bronze went to Adam Corneau of B.C.;

Winners in the post-secondary Sheet Metal category:

Gold went to Tom Martin of Ontario, Silver went to Steve Lapointe of New Brunswick, Bronze went to Spencer Tomlin of the Yukon Territories.

A handful of competitors will also be chosen and given the opportunity to establish their spot on the national team which will be sent to next year’s World Skills in Sao Paulo, Brazil where they’ll join more than 65 other national teams.

“The highest ranking age eligible medalist in each applicable contest area will be selected to compete in the WorldSkills Canadian Trials taking place in early 2015,” said Fortin.

“Competitors reaching pre-established Canadian standards will be named to the WorldSkills Team Canada 2015 and will participate at the WorldSkills Competition in Brazil”

Over 500 young people from across Canada competed in more than 40 contests this year.

It’s the first time in its 20-year history that SCNC has made a stop in Toronto.

JOC NEWS SERVICE

by Andre Widjaja last update:Jul 14, 2014

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